Skip to main content

Going For Green

What does going green mean?

Chances are, you’ve heard “going green” being bandied about quite a lot lately. Perhaps you’ve overheard a work colleague, or your parents mentioning it and you are wondering what does it actually mean and how can you get involved?

Going green is a gradual process for most people because it means implementing certain lifestyle changes that are designed to help you live in a more Eco-friendly way. You’ve become more environmentally aware and wish to change your lifestyle and behaviors to reduce the amount of waste and pollution you generate. You wish to protect the environment because the planet was here first.



Living a green lifestyle doesn’t mean huge drastic changes. Small and easy to manage changes to begin with makes all the difference. The smallest change with the biggest impact is of course recycling. Your local council has likely given you different bags and boxes for recycling, so be sure to use them. It takes moments to place a piece of plastic in its assigned recycle bag rather than the bin.

In England we generate about 177 million tonnes of waste every year. Waste sent to landfill produces methane which is a powerful greenhouse gas. While generally it is not directly harmful to humans, it is highly explosive and can cause death by asphyxiation. Methane can displace oxygen which is needed for breathing.

As well as recycling, you can do all the other little things you hear about:
•    Turning off the tap while brushing your teeth and showering instead of taking a bath can save bucket loads of water.
•    Switching lights off when you leave the room/when they are not necessary.
•    Getting around by foot where possible instead of using your car.
•    Planting a vegetable garden instead of using water hogging grass.
•    Purchasing organic and chemical products where possible.

While sometimes doing all of the above seems overwhelming and time consuming, you can just practice and implement one thing at a time rather than tackling everything at once.
Instead of driving your kids to the park, try getting there on foot. Make it fun by encouraging them to hop, skip and jump (carefully!) along the way. Having to journey home the same way means there will be big appetites and whatever is placed in front of them will be demolished and there will be no food wastage either. Bonus!

Going Green doesn’t sound too bad now does it?

Visit our website to find out more about us www.ecogreenitrecycling.co.uk - what we do to help protect the environment and how we can help you protect the environment.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Future of e-waste Recycling

Electronic and electrical goods have become indispensable parts of our lives now. We cannot think of surviving without these products anymore. For instance, just think of your life without your laptop, computer, your tab, your cell phone, the flat screen television and so on. Another interesting fact in this regard is that the electronic companies manufacture higher versions of these devices and we replace the older ones with the latest models. Research reports say that almost 30-50 million tons of electrical and electronic goods are simply thrown away every year. And such stuffs are categorized under e-waste. Survey reports also say that the volume of such wastes is expected to increase by 3-5% per year as people don’t hesitate progressing towards ‘smarter’ products by dumping the older ones.
Where do the older and used electronic products head to?

This is a very important question that needs answers. You might find the old cell phone or tablet tucked in some corner of the drawer or…

7 Ways to Improve Your Recycling Practices

Everyone knows about recycling these days but many still don’t know how they can improve their recycling practices. This will not only improve their lifestyle but also contribute a few positives towards the environment.
But before going into details, let us just go back and tell you how actually recycling got started. Well, it got started almost 40 years ago when a US paper company wanted a symbol for its customers to tell them about the products’ recycled content.
A design competition was held and in the end, a young graphic designer named Gary Anderson won the competition. His design is now universally recognised as the symbol for recycling.
When it comes to recycling, blue plastic bins and bottle drives pops up in the mind. Part of the problem, though, is that major bottling companies of beer and soft drinks use recycling to get rid of the responsibility of dealing with their own manufactured packaging. But actually, if you see it, recycling is much more than this. It is a design prin…

Top 4 Myths about WEEE Recycling

Go into any office these days, and will undoubtedly observe electronic gadgets. From PCs and mobile phones to photocopying machines and network devices, being utilized for a wide range of everyday exercises. But the picture becomes blurry when we talk about Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment recycling (WEEE recycling) . Once outdated, we should discard the hardware. It is amazing to discover where a considerable measure of those old gadgets wind up. As result of innovation and schedule obsolesces, old hardware is piling in storage space or distribution center. Or, more regrettable, in a landfill (ordinarily abroad). Directions are set up to keep the illicit dumping of utilized electronic hardware. As any organization’s representative knows, WEEE recycling at last boils down to assuming liability for your own association's activities. And ensuring that we legitimately discard all e-waste. Before, when WEEE recycling was as yet a novel idea, it may have been less demanding t…